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I need a colorist for a couple of pitches I've been working on.  No pay, but obviously, you'll get a piece of whatever profits are made, once the book is published.  Right now, I need colors on seven pages and a cover, for two different comic pitches.

Thanks!


KAB
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:iconytheartist:
ytheartist Featured By Owner Jan 14, 2014
Make sure all parties agree on a contractual agreement, be sure to discuss royalties or a flat fee. Also attach within the agreement that all members must be informed of any decisions made with the work you have taken the time in creating. Who will publish... If money is made, how will it be paid, what is your share, etc.

Just because its a none paid gig, doesn't mean somewhere down the line someone mite make something from your efforts.

Cheers
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:iconsaidestroyer:
SAIDESTROYER Featured By Owner May 13, 2012  Professional General Artist
That's a lot ask for no money, Kurt. You should know better.
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:iconkurtbelcher1:
KurtBelcher1 Featured By Owner May 13, 2012
Do I know you?


KAB
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:iconsaidestroyer:
SAIDESTROYER Featured By Owner May 15, 2012  Professional General Artist
I don't think so, but you made a shitty offer public. Be ready to get replys like mine.
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:iconkurtbelcher1:
KurtBelcher1 Featured By Owner May 15, 2012
I've made similar requests before. Yours is the first reply of its kind I've ever received. If you don't like it, just don't comment. It's what I do.


KAB
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:iconsaidestroyer:
SAIDESTROYER Featured By Owner May 15, 2012  Professional General Artist
Again, you made it PUBLIC, so I think it's my right to comment. If you didn't want comments, feel free to lock the thread and erase my comments.

Asking anybody to work for free under the premise of "I'll pay you some day, maybe, if I manage to make this profitable" is insulting to any artist worth his/her salt. In fact, any self-respectig artist won't take your offer. YOU take the risk, but pay your employee first.

It's the right thing to do, Kurt.
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:iconkurtbelcher1:
KurtBelcher1 Featured By Owner May 15, 2012
And these aren't employees. These are collaborators who understand this is how things work in American small press comics (and I suspect small press comics in other countries). They're people who want to make some decent comics. I work with inkers, toners, letterers, on books I'm having published now, and will have published in the future. If they can't do it beyond a certain point, they can (and have) moved on, and I don't begrudge them that. They and I both know that the prospect of getting paid in the small press is slim to nil. So those that I do work with, aren't working with me under the assumption that we're all going to get rich doing this. It'd be nice if we did, but we work together because we like making comics, and like working with one another. If someone needs to get paid up front, that's fine. I don't begrudge them that, either. I've done the same myself in similar situations. In situations where I have gotten paid for drawing something, I've split the profits with those I've brought in to help me on it. I'm doing it now on an independent book with Henrik Horvath. While I'd like to pay everyone I work with up front, it's not always feasible.


KAB
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:iconsaidestroyer:
SAIDESTROYER Featured By Owner May 17, 2012  Professional General Artist
OF COURSE you can't begrudge 'em. If you're not paying, you're not entitled to long-time work of any kind. If you're the project leader, it's your responsability to get the funds, and the risk is yours to take, not anybody else'.

In MY OPINION, getting them to work for free is both disrespectul of their individual talents and a waste of their time.

I love doing comics, but I wouldn't dare to ask anybody to work on MY ideas for free. I'll either borrow some money to pay upfront, or learn to do everything myself.

Again, my opinion.
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:iconkurtbelcher1:
KurtBelcher1 Featured By Owner May 15, 2012
You do have a right to comment. Not so much to make the comments you did. But don't expect me to like your comments. But I don't lock threads, block people, or delete comments. Just not how I work.

This is how you have to make comics sometimes: back end deals. It's not the best way to work, but it's the deal that most small U.S. comics companies that aren't DC or Marvel or Dark Horse have to use, because they don't have the capital to pay the people making the comics up front. When any money comes in from profits, they pay. And when I've gotten said money, I've paid it to the other members of the creative teams I've worked with. When not, I haven't. I'm not even a company, just a small-press creator. So most often, I can't afford to pay anything up front. I have in the past, when I've been able to afford it. You can ask Stefano Cardoselli about that. But I've accepted that that's the way things work right now, whether I like it or not. And for the most part, so have the teams I've worked with. No way around it for me, if I want to make comics.


KAB
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:iconsaidestroyer:
SAIDESTROYER Featured By Owner May 17, 2012  Professional General Artist
I appreciate that you are open to comments, even if you don't like 'em. I think I had a bit of a knee-jerk reaction when you said "Do I know you?"; I felt you were implying that my comments weren't valid and/or welcome.

As I said in the previous comment, I feel it's disrespectful to ask anybody to work under the promise of POSIBLE future payment. If YOUR idea doesn't take off, your associate/employee will have lost time and income that he'll never get back, at least from you. It's better to do everything yourself, and if you don't have an specific skill, learn it.

My 2 cents.
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